Great Dixter House and Gardens Map

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Blue Garden

Through the Wall Garden, you emerge through Lutyens’ second brick archway and should note his use of tiles, set on edge, in the paving at the start of his double flight of steps, the first, curved…

Christopher Lloyd

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Cat Garden

This area has a damp meadow containing marginals such as Caltha polypetala amongs vigorous perennials such as Ranunculus acris ‘Stevenii’ and Symphythum ‘Romanian Red’…

Fergus Garrett

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Orchard Garden

The three beds either side of the narrow corridor from the Long Border to the High Garden contain nursery stock informally arranged in groups and interspersed with self sowers…

Fergus Garrett

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Lower Moat

The Lower Moat still contains water. The giant Gunnera manicata flanks the moat to one side with Skunk Cabbage, Lysichiton americanum forming impressive colonies in the mud…

Fergus Garrett

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Topiary Lawn

A closely planted strip of ash trees on the garden’s west boundary, provide wonderful silhouettes of airy foliage against the sunset sky, in summer, but they do shed much seed into the garden…

Christopher Lloyd

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Upper Moat

The Upper Moat used to contain water but was drained by the Lloyds and turned into a meadow. Daisy Lloyd called this her ‘Botticelli garden’…

Fergus Garrett

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Solar Garden

Annuals and tender bedding plants feature prominently throughout the gardens, but they are not often seen in obvious beds of their own and cut off from other features…

Christopher Lloyd

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Prairie

This section of long grass used to have rows of fruit trees until they were blown down by recent hurricanes. The meadow contains high concentrations of Common Spotted and Twayblade orchids…

Fergus Garrett

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Peacock Garden

A yew archway, leading to a garden containing 18 topiary birds. Originally intended as pheasants, fighting cocks, blackbirds and suchlike, we nowadays refer to them all as peacocks…

Christopher Lloyd

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Sunk Garden

My father was responsible for the design and making of the Sunk Garden, originally lawn, then dug up for vegetables during the First World War, after which my father said ‘Now we can play’…

Christopher Lloyd

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Horse Pond

This informal semi-natural pond was used by the heavy horses that once worked the land at Dixter. Waterlilies decorate the water. The pond is clay lined and has a ring of willows…

Fergus Garrett

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Orchard

This is our principal area of meadow stretching almost the whole south side of the garden. Studded with apples, pears, plums, hawthorns and crabs, the meadow stretches into the landscape…

Fergus Garrett

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Vegetable Garden

Vegetables are grown for the kitchen as in Christopher Lloyd’s day and are also sold from the front porch of the house…

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Front Meadow

Your first sight, on entering the front gate, is of two areas of rough grass, either side of the path to the house. These, and a number of other, similar areas, scattered through the garden…

Christopher Lloyd

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High Garden

A yew archway takes you out of the Long Border and through a passage garden, up to the High Garden. Look towards the house as you walk up the steps. There is a nice echo between…

Christopher Lloyd

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Long Border

We are now at the bottom of the main section of the Long Border. Note the effective arrangement whereby it is separated from the informality of the orchard meadow…

Christopher Lloyd

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Exotic Garden

You can walk through the ‘hovel’, an old cow shed, on to the site of a one-time cattle yard (with their drinking tank in the centre), where Lutyens designed a formal rose garden…

Christopher Lloyd

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Barn Garden

The Barn Garden has the merit of giving a good view across it wherever you may be standing. Visitors sometimes say ‘If I could have just one bit of your garden, it would be this’…

Christopher Lloyd

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Wall Garden

A rectangle of walls which cause destructive wind eddies and vortices. The protection they afford is largely in the imagination. The central rectangular lawn…

Christopher Lloyd

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Learning

Adult education courses, activities for families, children and school groups are run at our new education facility at Dixter farm buildings as well as in the house and in the garden…

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House Tour

Learn about the parts of the house – from the medieval manor to Lloyd and Lutyens…

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Great Barn

The Great Barn and Oast are now open to visitors. Read about their history…

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Oast House

The oast house at Great Dixter is a reminder of the time when growing hops was very important to farming in the Weald of East Sussex and Kent. The dried flower of the hop plant…

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Shop

The Shop stocks tools, workwear, gifts and locally made items…

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Nursery

Visit the Nursery. Plants for sale, seeds, tools and pots…

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